environment

Dr. Howard Walters

Dr. Howard Walters, Professor, is the author or co-author of 36 scholarly, peer-reviewed research studies and 44 national or international peer-reviewed conference presentations. He has been first author and Principal Investigator of 65 federally funded research proposals over the last 17 years. His research focus has addressed the K-12 teacher education pipeline to include post-licensure continuing professional development, particularly in the arena of science and technology education, and informal education in zoos, aquariums, museums and science centers. He has authored one book on professional development for science teachers (2008).

Dr. Walters has served as internal or external evaluator for a series of regional and national science education and teacher education programs for agencies including the National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Ocean Partnership Program. These projects have included Operation Pathfinder, Global Environmental Education (NSF Teacher Enhancement projects), GLOBE (the NOAA funded components), and the southeastern regional National Sea Grant systemic initiative projects for marine invasive species for Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Sea Grant programs. He has served as the external evaluator for the Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education (CORE) and its National Ocean Sciences Bowl since 1998, and a variety of other K-12 student and teacher education initiatives for National Geographic Education, the National Estuarine Research Reserves, NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration, and 14 of the country’s State Sea Grant College Programs. He served as the external evaluator for the projects which resulted in NOAA’s Ocean Literacy Standards working with National Geographic and not-for-profit The College of Exploration, and is currently external evaluator for NSF’s Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence Great Lakes and Coastal Trends programs.

Tanzeah Sharpe

Tanzeah Sharpe, Professional Instructor, joined Ashland University in 2006 after having taught as an adjunct instructor for four years. Mrs. Sharpe has a Bachelors of Science in Psychology from Walsh University, Master of Education in Curriculum & Instruction in Early Childhood Education from Ashland University and is completing her Ed.D. in Leadership Studies at Ashland University. She has taught a variety of courses for both preschool through primary grade education, and is currently teaching education classes for assessment and evaluation of young children with special needs, early intervention and integration for young children with special needs. Ms. Sharpe is director of the workshop in teaching and intervention.

Dr. Mason Posner

Dr. Mason Posner has students use molecular biology techniques to understand how eye lens proteins adapt to changes in environmental temperature.

We are currently investigating the evolution and biological role of lens proteins called crystallins. These proteins are responsible for making the lens transparent and refracting light so that focused images fall on the retina. Amazingly, one family of crystallins, the alpha crystallins, also protect other proteins from the harmful effects of aging that can lead to lens cataracts, one of the leading causes of blindness in humans. Alpha crystallins are also involved in the original development of the lens in vertebrate embryos, and they have been linked to many diseases of the nervous system, heart, skeletal muscle, and are now known to be involved in many cancers.

Most research into alpha crystallins is done with mammals. However, by studying how this protein has evolved in a number of fish species that live at different environmental temperatures, from the antarctic toothfish to the tropical zebrafish, we are discovering small evolutionary changes in the protein that alter its function. This helps us understand how alpha cystallins evolve, and gives us insights into how these proteins could be engineered to prevent disease.

In more recent projects my students and I are using the zebrafish as a model organism to study the role of alpha crystallins in the development of the lens. We also use zebrafish to study the toxic effects of pesticides.

Degrees:
PhD in Biology, University of Southern California
BA in Biology, University of Virginia

Courses Taught:
Bio 100 Human Biology; Bio 202 Organisms, Adaptation and Diversity; Bio 225/225 Anatomy and Physiology; Bio 328 Vertebrate Biology; Bio 412 Marine Biology; Bio 480 Special Topics (Evolution); Bio 495 Senior Seminar

Research Areas
Eye lens biochemistry and cataract
Evolution and function of the vertebrate eye lens
Eye lens development

Dr. Mark Hamilton

Dr. Mark Hamilton

Dr. Mark Hamilton is associate professor of philosophy and NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, where he has taught full time since 1985. Dr. Hamilton began as an adjunct in philosophy and as assistant baseball coach in 1981. He previously served as chair of the philosophy department for 6 years. He has published numerous articles and chapters on Sports Ethics in books such as Baseball and Philosophy; The Image of God in the Human Body; Basketball and Philosophy; Football and Philosophy; Theology, Ethics and Transcendence; Poker and Philosophy; Ethics in Coaching Sports and his article on the morality of surgical enhancement for athletic performance has been widely disseminated and quoted. He has presented papers at numerous International Conferences on Sports Ethics along with related journal articles. Besides Sports Ethics, he has taught numerous courses in Philosophy of Religion, Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, Christian Thought, Human Nature, and on C.S. Lewis, about whom he has also published. Dr. Hamilton is active in the International Association of Philosophy of Sport, and in 2012 was the guest editor of the Journal of Philosophy of Sport and has been named to the editorial board of this journal. He has separate masters’ degrees in Philosophy, Religion, and Counseling and a doctorate from Ashland Theological Seminary. He received a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion from Wittenberg University where he also captained the baseball team. Dr. Hamilton also co-pastors Providence Church and in 2007 he survived a liver transplant. Hamilton has been married for over 30 years with two grown and married daughters and two grandchildren.is associate professor of philosophy and NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, where he has taught full time since 1985. Dr. Hamilton began as an adjunct in philosophy and as assistant baseball coach in 1981. He previously served as chair of the philosophy department for 6 years. He has published numerous articles and chapters on Sports Ethics in books such as Baseball and Philosophy; The Image of God in the Human Body; Basketball and Philosophy; Football and Philosophy; Theology, Ethics and Transcendence; Poker and Philosophy; Ethics in Coaching Sports and his article on the morality of surgical eis associate professor of philosophy and NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative at Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio, where he has taught full time since 1985. Dr. Hamilton began as an adjunct in philosophy and as assistant baseball coach in 1981. He previously served as chair of the philosophy department for 6 years. He has published numerous articles and chapters on Sports Ethics in books such as Baseball and Philosophy; The Image of God in the Human Body; Basketball and Philosophy; Football and Philosophy; Theology, Ethics and Transcendence; Poker and Philosophy; Ethics in Coaching Sports and his article on the morality of surgical enhancement for athletic performance has been widely disseminated and quoted. He has presented papers at numerous International Conferences on Sports Ethics along with related journal articles. Besides Sports Ethics, he has taught numerous courses in Philosophy of Religion, Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, Christian Thought, Human Nature, and on C.S. Lewis, about whom he has also published. Dr. Hamilton is active in the International Association of Philosophy of Sport, and in 2012 was the guest editor of the Journal of Philosophy of Sport and has been named to the editorial board of this journal. He has separate masters’ degrees in Philosophy, Religion, and Counseling and a doctorate from Ashland Theological Seminary. He received a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion from Wittenberg University where he also captained the baseball team. Dr. Hamilton also co-pastors Providence Church and in 2007 he survived a liver transplant. Hamilton has been married for over 30 years with two grown and married daughters and two grandchildren. nhancement for athletic performance has been widely disseminated and quoted. He has presented papers at numerous International Conferences on Sports Ethics along with related journal articles. Besides Sports Ethics, he has taught numerous courses in Philosophy of Religion, Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, Christian Thought, Human Nature, and on C.S. Lewis, about whom he has also published. Dr. Hamilton is active in the International Association of Philosophy of Sport, and in 2012 was the guest editor of the Journal of Philosophy of Sport and has been named to the editorial board of this journal. He has separate masters’ degrees in Philosophy, Religion, and Counseling and a doctorate from Ashland Theological Seminary. He received a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion from Wittenberg University where he also captained the baseball team. Dr. Hamilton also co-pastors Providence Church and in 2007 he survived a liver transplant. Hamilton has been married for over 30 years with two grown and married daughters and two grandchildren.

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